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Michigan Flooding Destroys Local Fiero Repair Shop

One man’s specialty repair shop and museum is subsumed by the Tittabawassee River during historic flooding.

It hurts to see something like this. From all reports, Fieros Forever was a work of love by a man named Tim Evans, and his specialty shop worked on, preserved, and displayed Pontiac's sporty little mid-engined runabout. The shop, located in Midland, Michigan, was struck by floodwaters that were released when the Edenville Dam failed during immense rainfall this month. The floodwaters then crested the Sanford Dam, upstream on the Tittabawassee River from Midland, where Fieros Forever is located. As you can see, the result is heartbreaking.

Of course, these are cars, which can—given time and money—be repaired. The human cost of the flooding will be harder to fix than a handful of Pontiacs. But what happened to this Fiero shop is just a slice of the unfolding tragedy in the Tittabawassee River floodplains.

As seen in the photos above, shared by Jim Roberts of Cheddar, the Fieros Forever building suffered immense damage, and the floodwaters ultimately scattered the Fieros around the area. Some look like they were simply carried downstream a bit before being deposited in front of various downtown storefronts, but others ended up overturned. The Pontiac Fiero's fiberglass bodywork will be a blessing here since it won't rust after inundation, but there's no denying that this is going to be a big cleanup job for Evans.

There's no telling what happened to the museum portion of his shop's collection of memorabilia and historical treasures, let alone the 1984 Indianapolis 500 Pace Car on display. The rare Fiero was due to hit the auction block, as The Drive pointed out, along with several other cars in the museum.

We hope Evans can rebuild his shop, restore the cars, and dry out his collection. But it'll be an uphill battle—as it will be for all residents of the Midland area affected by the catastrophic flooding.