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Coronavirus Drives Ferrari to Suspend Vehicle Production

Plants in Maranello and Modena have temporarily stopped production amidst Italy's crisis.

Plants in Maranello and Modena have temporarily stopped production amidst Italy's crisis.

In response to the growing COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, Ferrari has temporarily stopped production at its plants in Maranello and Modena, Italy. Ferrari’s current plan calls for the plants to come back online March 27, although that, we assume, is highly up in the air as the coronavirus continues to ravage Italy and keeps spreading around the globe. This is only the latest automotive impact from the pandemic, which has shut down motorsports events and sent workers home from automakers around the world.

Ferrari also notes that it is experiencing the “first serious supply chain issues, which no longer allow for continued production.” Scuderia Ferrari has also suspended its operational activities. Prior to the shutdown, Ferrari had reduced its workforce at the plants and took measures to guarantee high health standards as Italy bears the worst of Europe’s coronavirus outbreak. Ferrari says it will continue all non-manufacturing operations on a regular basis.

In a statement, Ferrari CEO Louis Camilleri said, “My gratitude goes first and foremost to Ferrari’s women and men who, with their tremendous commitment over the past few days, have demonstrated the passion and dedication that defines our marque. Together with our suppliers, they have ensured the Company’s production. And it is out of our respect for them, for their peace of mind and those of their families that we have decided on this course of action.”

Rival sports car–maker Lamborghini shut down its Italian plant until March 25, while other automakers, including Fiat Chrysler and PSA are also announcing production stoppages. Auto companies are asking their employees around the world to work from home as the virus spreads, and school closures in America could soon mean manufacturing workers will stay home to care for their children, bringing U.S. production to a halt.